how mainstream media unknowingly helps the anc use zuma as its racial jesus

“[W]hat will shape South Africa’s political destiny is not “the truth” but the careful navigation and understanding of how words are digested by those watching and listening.”
A deeply perceptive piece by Siya Khumalo about how South Africans are talking past one another.

sanitythinksoutloud.com

Almost everyone on my Facebook has been asking the same question: how did the #ZumaMustFallMarch become about race? Isn’t it clear that the current president is bad news for the country?

Jacob Zuma – the person and the president, the body that is depicted visually and the figure that is related to politically – is the terrain on which South Africa’s race issues have played themselves out in weird and telling ways. Without realising it, mainstream media has done the ANC a huge favour in playing up the DA’s “Zuma is corrupt” trope because as well-intentioned and truthful as it may be, what it’s done is exacerbate the friction among the races – especially between black and white people – because white people do not know how to level an insult so it lands where it’s intended. This is because colonialism and apartheid skewed racial relations.

Let’s say Jacob Zuma…

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this is for zuma, ramaphosa and all the other rotten, murderous, lying scumbags in high places

When I try to write anything about Zuma and our government, police force and judiciary, and the foreign companies who have them in their thrall, only the foulest swear words I know will come out.

So, I’ll quote Frantz Fanon: “Zombies, believe me, are more terrifying than colonists.”

vice v – mr president

“Mr President” is the controversial first single released on Long Talk 2 Freedom. It is a work of hip-hop protest literature which deals with the failed presidency of Jacob Zuma. The work remixes, and was inspired by, Tunisian rapper El-general’s classic, “Rayes lebled”, which became the theme song of the Tunisian revolution which brought Tunisian Prime Minister Zine El Abidine Ben Ali down in 2011.

Written, produced, mixed and mastered by Sizwe Mpofu-Walsh aka Vice V
Recorded by Tiger.X

Speeches referenced:
T. Lekota, “Response to the State of the Nation Address”, February, 2013.
J. Malema, “They Shot us Behind the Mountain: Address on the First Anniversary of the Marikana Massacre”, August, 2013.

http://longtalk2freedom.com/

more of the same old, same old…

Johannesburg – The media coverage of the upgrades to President Jacob Zuma’s Nkandla home required government to “dust off” apartheid-era legislation, media law expert Dario Milo said on Friday.

“The Public Works Minister’s (Thulas Nxesi) response to the (Zuma/Nkandla) expose was twofold,” Milo said at Wits University in Johannesburg.

“(These were) to call for the City Press, which first broke the story, to be investigated for the crime of unlawfully processing a ‘top secret’ document, and to refuse to answer questions about the Nkandla funding because it had been declared a ‘national key point’.”

He said both these propositions required Nxesi to use apartheid-era security legislation such as the Protection of Information Act of 1982 and the National Key Points Act of 1980.

“This is hardly the type of legislation I would want to be relying on if I were in the minister’s position.”

The use of these laws was a current threat to media freedom and was being used to stifle transparency and accountability, he said.

Read more of this article HERE.