nina simone – live at montreux – 1976, 1987 and 1990

Just incredible. I wish I could have seen her perform, just once.

Tracklisting:
1976
1. Little Girl Blue
2. Backlash Blues
3. Be My Husband
4. I Wish I Knew (How It Would Feel to be Free)
5. Stars / Feelings
6. African Mailman

1987
7. Someone to Watch Over Me
8. My Baby Just Cares For Me

1990
9. I Loves You Porgy
10. Liberian Calypso
11. Four Women / Mississippi Goddam
12. Ne Me Quitte Pas (Don’t Leave Me)

rainy day – rainy day (full album, 1984)

The Paisley Underground scene of L.A. bands of the 1980s — of which David Roback’s bands Rain Parade, Clay Allison, Opal, and Mazzy Star were a part — was in part inspired by 1960s rock/psychedelia. This Rainy Day album was David’s project. It contains covers of nine of his favourite songs from the 1960s, and one from the 1970s (“Holocaust”). He enlisted musicians and singers from a variety of Paisley Underground bands to collaborate on the album.

Tracklisting
A1 – “I’ll Keep It With Mine” (Bob Dylan)
Guitar, Tambourine, Vocals – David Roback; Violin – Will Glenn; Bass – Michael Quercio; Lead Vocals – Susanna Hoffs
A2 – “John Riley” (B. Gibson, R. Neff. A folk song covered by The Byrds in 1966)
Drums – Dennis Duck; Guitar [Acoustic 12-string] – Matthew Piucci; Guitar [Electric 12-string], Vocals – David Roback; Violin, Vocals – Will Glenn; Lead Vocals, Bass – Michael Quercio
A3 – “Flying On The Ground Is Wrong” (Neil Young/Buffalo Springfield)
Guitar – David Roback; Lead and Background Vocals – Kendra Smith; Background Vocals – Susanna Hoffs
A4 – “Sloop John B.” (Traditional. The Beach Boys had a 1966 hit with their arrangement)
Drums – Dennis Duck; Guitar, Congas – David Roback; Keyboards – Ethan James; Lead Vocals, Bass, Percussion – Michael Quercio
A5 – Soon Be Home (Pete Townshend/The Who)
Bass, Drums – Michael Quercio; Tambourine – “Spock”; Background Vocals – Susanna Hoffs, Vicki Peterson; Lead Vocals, Guitar – David Roback
B1 – “Holocaust” (Alex Chilton/Big Star)
Cello, Violin – Will Glenn; Guitar – David Roback; Piano – Steven Roback; Piano [Backwards] – Ethan James; Vocals – Kendra Smith
B2 – “On The Way Home” (Neil Young/Buffalo Springfield)
Vocals, Guitar – David Roback
B3 – “I’ll Be Your Mirror” (Lou Reed/Velvet Underground)
Guitar, Bass, Tambourine – David Roback; Lead and Background Vocals – Kendra Smith; Lead Vocals, Guitar – Susanna Hoffs
B4 – “Rainy Day, Dream Away” (Jimi Hendrix)
Bass, Keyboards – Ethan James; Drums – Dennis Duck; Guitar – Karl Precoda; Congas – David Roback; Lead Vocals – Michael Quercio Continue reading

on self knowledge

Image: Eric Rondpierre

Image: Eric Rondpierre

Self knowledge is not fully possible for human beings. We do not reside in a body, a mind or a world where it is achievable or, from the point of being interesting, even desirable. Half of what lies in the heart and mind is potentiality, resides in the darkness of the unspoken and unarticulated and has not yet come into being: this hidden unspoken half of a person will supplant and subvert any present understandings we have about ourselves. Human beings are always, and always will be, a frontier between what is known and what is not known. The act of turning any part of the unknown into the known is simply an invitation for an equal measure of the unknown to flow in and reestablish that frontier: to reassert the far horizon of an individual life; to make us what we are – that is – a moving edge between what we know about ourselves and what we are about to become. What we are actually about to become or are afraid of becoming always trumps and rules over what we think we are already…

– David Whyte, 2014. Excerpted from “Self Knowledge”, from the upcoming book of essays CONSOLATIONS: The Solace, Nourishment and Underlying Meaning in Everyday Words.

lumumba’s ghosts: immaterial matters and matters immaterial…

peerenThe Archive & Public Culture Research Initiative (where I work) has invited Esther Peeren, author of The Spectral Metaphor: Living Ghosts and the Agency of Invisibility (Palgrave, 2014), for a week of intense discussion, academic exchange and engagement around the theme of the ghost/spectre both as archival metaphor and as conceptual figure in post-colonial and cultural studies.

Peeren is Associate Professor of Media Studies at the University of Amsterdam, Vice-Director of the Amsterdam Centre for Globalisation Studies (ACGS) and senior researcher at the Amsterdam School for Cultural Analysis (ASCA). Her current research projects explore global spectralities and rural globalization.

On Tuesday, 26 August, she will deliver a lunchtime lecture, Lumumba’s Ghosts: Immaterial Matters and Matters Immaterial in Sven Augustijnen’s Spectres, in the Jon Berndt Thought Space (A17, Arts Block, Upper Campus, University of Cape Town). In her analysis of Belgian artist Sven Augustijnen’s 2011 multi-media exhibition, Spectres (which focuses on the mystery of the 1961 assassination of Patrice Lumumba, the first democratically elected Prime Minister of the independent Republic of the Congo), Peeren argues that a focus on immaterialities-as-spectralities prompts the viewer to take seriously that which is not immediately apprehensible, or deemed inconsequential. At the same time, it transforms our understanding of matter itself, since immateriality is inevitably implied in materiality, both metaphorically (materialities may be considered immaterial, insignificant) and literally (over time, materialities may transform, decay or even disappear).

Appealing to Jacques Derrida’s concept of spectrality, her analysis shows how Augustijnen’s work, especially the feature-length film included in the exhibition, moves the materiality of the immaterial and the immateriality of the material centre stage, and lays out the consequences of this double imbrication for individual and collective understandings of history, memory and the archive.

If you’d like to attend pn 26 August, RSVP to APC-admin@uct.ac.za.